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voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
99 weeks. these folks have been out of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of wor
and i sent them to the uk for the quality of education there for a better future and maybe the chance to work. how is this criminal? to have dreams for my children and family and working hard every day. >> now in the meantime, the banks are still closed and there are reports that the two sick banks which should have been able to re-open tomorrow because the emp cb said they would provide liquidity says that they may not open until at least thursday. that would be 12 days with the major banks closed. people are going to the super markets. there may be a food shortage. why was this woman buying so much? she was from russia and she has seen this movie before and she fears shortages. >> you're originally from russia? >> yes, exactly. i have lived through this. uncertainties and yes, i'm worried. >> is that why you think you're doing this today? because you have seen this before? >> yes. i have seen how it develops and how quickly and badly it can develop. >> so the president of this country is supposed to appear any moment. he's usually late and might be worse because there is a meeting t
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
is not just to entertain you, but i'm trying to teach and educate you so call me, 1-800-743-cnbc. look, maybe it just needs to go lower. that's what i thought all day as the market see-sawed. the dow closing down 90 points, s&p back sliding .83%. nasdaq falling 0.97%. to me the stock market is represented by the broad averages. the sum of the evidence that's out there right now about where things are headed in the future. in the last 24 hours, the weight of the evidence has shifted to the negative. unless we get some big breaks here, these negatives will begin to be reflected in the averages beyond where they went out today. you know i've said repeatedly i'm willing to take a pass of the last percent or two of the rally because i don't want to be greedy. bulls make money, bears make money and hogs are slaughtered. i thought it would take out the high by now, inspiring too much short-term euphoria. that hasn't happened, which in itself i find worrisome. i didn't that like so many of the loudest bears out there like adam parker, nice guy, morgan stanley, have just turned bullish. it did bother
'm trying to teach and educate you so call me, 1-800-743-cnbc. look, maybe it just needs to go lower. that's what i thought all day as the market see-sawed. the dow closing down 90 points, s&p back sliding .83%. nasdaq falling 0.97%. to me the stock market is represented by the broad averages. a day when the dow gained 91 points. the s&p climbed.27% and the nasdaq advanced .70. the market in short fails to behave as if it's europe with its cyprus fiasco, or as if it's china with its endless, is it boom? is it bust chatter? it's almost as if we're back in the old days. before we became so weak -- and yet so intertwined, and all we had to do was look how overseas markets were faring and we would know how we would do for the day pretty much before we opened. yet there's still plenty of funds living in yester year prophesying doom on the radar screen. >> the house of pain! >> which is actually quite a fitting place to begin our game plan for next week because monday is the deadline for cyprus to come up with a plan suitable to the european and imf banking authorities in order to get desperatel
. so now we have two women on the board. you have to educate women that they shouldn't accept something that doesn't make sense but it is, as a ceo, male or female, you're responsible for doing the right thing and if you're public for your shareholders, which is women represent 55% of the workforce now. so it's crazy not to pay them the same. >> is this going to make an impact, this book? >> i think it has. look at john chambers at cisco putting out a memo to his company saying they haven't done enough. not just on the pay gap but the percentage of women that are at management level. i think it's already made a huge impact. >> let's turn to this tax issue. we have seen amazon deal with it on a state by state basis. the stock hasn't really reflected the sort of lingering concern over state sales tax spp this a game changer for the industry or not? >> well, i think -- i think what's happened is this was supposed to be a few years and it's now been about 20. so i think it was good at the beginning but it's been unfair to other retailers, which is why should -- if either everybody collects
to entertain you but to educate you. so on this fabulous eighth anniversary of "mad money," i want you to continue to call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. welcome to the eighth anniversary edition of "mad money." not a great day for an anniversary although the dow broke its winning streak. i'll be unabashed about it. sinking 25 points. nasdaq declining -- i realized regular people that play this game needed help. you needed guidance from someone impartial who wasn't after your fees, didn't want your commissions. in short, you needed an investing coach. i've been trying to fill that role every night five nights a week ever since. so tonight to mark the show's fantastic eighth anniversary, we're going to do the exact same thing we always do, help you try to make some money the best way we know how. let's get into it. start with the game plan. we've got a smatter of earnings coming out. before we get to that focus on the event that will control the market next week, there's not too much to this because wednesday there's a federal reserve meeting. i'm going to be blunt. from now on we are on fbfh wa
a hoveround can take you! >>> believe it or not, you want to educate yourself about business you can learn a heck of a lot from monopoly, the fabulous board game that i used to win at almost all of the time as a kid mostly because my family didn't want to deal with me being a sore loser. confidentially, i did like to turn the board over and stomp out of the room in tears if i lost! >> wow! >> so i don't blame them for letting me win. you remember how monopoly works, right? when someone lands on the space they owe you 25 smackers monopoly money, but -- oh, it's chinese money. it's probably worth a fortune, but if you own all four railroads and if you have a monopoly on the rail business in this imaginary world, and another player lands on them, then you have to pay the guy $200. that's a fortune, right? that's a fortune. what the heck does this have to do with the real world or the real stock market? simple. it teaches us that as companies have more market share and less competition they can make their customers pay them a heck of a lot more money like the railroads. a monopoly is a wonderf
, thank you for the education, thanks for the laughs, hash tag mad money. harlem shake, too. yeah, we did a good one. ♪ >> hi, jim, how you doing? >> real good, how about you? >> i got a cold. >> i'm sorry. have you tried z-pack. it kills you but it is also good. >> when i say bo you say yah. boo! >> yah! >> boo! >> yah! >> heather that works for you, she's a swell gal. >> she went to the u. this is about business. you can learn a heck of a lot from monopoly. confidentially, i like to turn the board over and stomp out of the room in tears if i lost. so i don't blame them for letting me win. i bring all this up because you know what we're doing this week, we are playing oligopoly. oligopoly the investing game, we can help try to make you real money. not real money, bogus money. ♪ [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on
picked georgetown. nova is still mine. we'll start with a tweet, thank you for the education, thanks for the laughs, #mad money. harlem shake, too. yeah, we did a good one. ♪ >> hi, jim, how you doing? >> real good, how about you? >> i got a cold. >> i'm sorry. have you tried z-pack. it kills you but it is also good. >> when i say bo you say yah. boo! >> yah! >> boo! >> yah! >> heather that works for you, she's a swell gal. >> she went to the u. this is about business. you can learn a heck of a lot from monopoly. confidentially, i like to turn the board over and stomp out of the room in tears if i lost. so i don't blame them for letting me win. i bring all this up because you know what we're doing this week, we are playing oligopoly. oligopoly the investing game, we can help try to make you real money. not real money, bogus money. >>> before we get to your tweets, time to catch up on some homework. back on february 6th steve in florida called for input on black rock kelso capital, bkcc for all you home gamers. i didn't know it and introduced digging, black rock kelso invests in wha
job is not just to entertain but do a little educating and teaching so call me at 1-800-7843-cnbc. you figure it would have to spill over eventually. the way the europeans handled that cyprus situation. dow sinking 64 points, nasdaq down 3.4%. even the best of all the worst plans like this one would be viewed askance by the rest of the world's financial capitals and that's what happened today. why does it have to go like this? why do we have to react to europe? i think part of the plan is europe has to plan to bring growth back. it pulls the world down to its own suit as if it were wearing cement galoshes. they allow jobs to be taken away without environmental an enforcement. why build factories in europe when you can make them in government, pollute the air, cheap energy for the factory and low shipping costs? that's become the american way. i'm calling it continental-cide. confiscating deposits will inspire fear when confidence is needed. fear makes people act differently. it takes away the confidence they need for the future. that tightens credit. never forget that the entomology of
chronicles in his memoir, "valley boy: the education of tom perkins." it is a candid account of his life, his second marriage to romance novelist danielle steel, a manslaughter conviction in a boating accident in france, and the deals that made him so wealthy, starting with the first biotech company, genentech, here in san francisco. he and his partners launched genentech in 1976 with nothing more than a checkbook and an idea. >> the idea was to trick nature into letting us make something that didn't exist in nature -- in particular, human insulin. >> genentech's success led to new ways of treating everything from diabetes to dwarfism, and to getting rich. kleiner perkins' initial investment of $250,000 soared 800-fold to $200 million. >> that's what venture capitalists are created to do, and you can blame converting the orchards of silicon valley into parking lots partly on me and partly on genentech, because we proved that this kind of high-risk, high-tech venture capital could be an enormous home run, and everybody wanted to get in on it, including lots of entrepreneurs, and that's what go
trying to save you the money. my job is not just to entertain you but to educate you so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. too positive? too negative? or maybe positive with a skeptical bent. each day i try to gauge whether i am too optimistic or pessimistic when all i really want to be is an informed skeptic. especially on volatile days like today where the average is see saw, down, close be up four points. s&p slipping 2.4%. this morning on "squawk on the street," we had kind of a philosophical discussion about what's the right tone to offer you, the viewer. brian sullivan discussed the possibility of being too negative, and if you're too negative during the last european bank crisis, you left a huge amount of moolah on the table, enough to have true seller's remorse about the decision. he pondered the notion you can't be so negative you think the world is about to come to an end. even though people who are that pessimistic sound smarter to many who watch. sound smarter. that's right. brian contended that the pessimists somehow come off as more informed and that the optimists are perceived
% this year. how about apollo group? the for profit education company ripping higher. another name in the green. second quarter profit drops 79%. revenue fell amid lower enrollments. still, results besting the street's expectations. another name we should mention, dollar general, telling us today that sales growth this year could best the strength in 2012. but the company's rival, family dollar, actually slipping. analysts tell me part of the problem here, dollar general now saying it's roll out of tobacco products exceeding expectations. remember, family dollar got into the tobacco business about a year ago. so some worry now about the impact the company might feel. blackberry another name in the red. goldman sachs cutting its rating to neutral on this one. price target 17 bucks. the analysts talking about the disappointing u.s. launch of the new z-10 smartphone. we'll end here on facebook. falling to the lowest level this year, since trading at a six-month high of 32.51 on january 28th. facebook shares down some 20%. sue? back to you. >> thank you very much, josh. >>> we have les
some of the proceeds from the sale of its education business. dell climbing higher today. as did visa. where analysts at nomura see positive first half data points fueling new highs on this one. visa hitting a new 52-week high today. some of your laggards today, bill, red hat. analysts at raymond james downgrade it to market perform ahead of its earnings report on wednesday, saying there are risks to its growth outlook. red hat your worst performer today in the s&p. other names losing ground, ebay, first solar and check point software. a notable laggard in the nasdaq. analysts at lazard say palo alto networks looks to be gaining ground on it rivals. downgrade check point to neutral. >>> much more ahead on your way to a very busy edition of "closing bell." >> just getting started. >> the plate is so full. up next, bull versus bear. someone here sees the s&p 500 hitting 1600 by the end of the year. is he right? stick around for our market debate. that's coming up next. >>> by the way, uberbear harry dent is on the other side in a big way. >> he does not see 1600 on the s&p. >> nope. >>>
like feeding programs in ethiopia and agriculture education in afghanistan. and he records it all through the lens of his own camera. >> you all of a sudden begin to kind of look around, and you notice there's a lot of people around that don't look too good. and, you know, they're hungry. and they don't have great living quarters. they may not have access to water. they don't have good sanitation. >> you were seeing farmers who couldn't feed themselves? >> oh, absolutely. i looked at that, and i thought, "you know, this is wrong. i understand agriculture. i should be able to do something about this." [ticking] >> coming up: the challenges of philanthropy. >> you know bill gates. have you said to him, "80% of what you're throwing down there in africa is not gonna work"? >> well, i've said it a little differently, i think, and that is that we need to quit thinking about trying to do it like we do it in america. >> the buffetts and bill gates when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. it's a new day. if your a man with low testosterone, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm tr
international. helping survivors of war and conflict. finance international providing financial education to children around the world. >> that's great. >> right out of the gates, we've got the nasdaq composite down by a little bit more than 1%. feeling the brunt of the losses early on in trading. >> isn't that funny? >> google was, frankly, was there a note last week that they didn't talk about, that google may have trouble making -- look, i'm just pointing out that there is an old -- new tech came under pressure last week at the same time that the western digitals and the sandesk. >> i can say something about google for a second? >> no. i'm sorry. 2 got zero play and nobody cared. i'm the only one that scared now it's ebay. >> and it came out with a big report that basically said in their testing, paid search which is 90% of google's revenue. >> yes. >> made no impact on click through rates or results. that basically free, just being out there with your meditags and everything else was just as good as paid search. it had all of these algorithms and i didn't understand half of it, but i
know, in france and in europe, the level of education for people is very high. so we have a very, very strong, you know, population to work. we have very strong infrastructure. so it's also a big place to invest. >> are you a supporter of holland and some of the things he's done? >> well, you know, they've done a few things. i would love to have more to be done, to be done because i think, again, france needs to be more attractive. >> are you rooming with -- >> i thought he was in russia now. >> even though he's an honorary citizen. >> we have a lot of business in europe, in russia, actually, and we are citizens of the world. >> that's a good answer. >> that's a good answer. >> very slippery. >> you spent a lot of time on diversity in women. >> yeah. >> and women in the workplace, given cheryl samberg's new book is a real issue. >> yeah. >> have you read the book? >> no, i've not read the book, but i've heard about the book, yep. >> the reason i ask -- >> what were you going to say? >> i have another question when you're done. >> the reason i was going to ask was whether you agree with
public accountants. i said, listen, you're an educated guy. you must have had a lot of wealthy clients and business people. here's what he said. >> all the assurances they get from european officials was that their deposits are not at risk. there may be other need for additional taxes for significant government cuts. the loans actually supports their banking system. but there was never discussion of any cut on depolisitsdeposit >> in other words, they were expecting traditional types of austerity. when we have more news we'll get it to you. >> let's cross over to moscow with steve sedgwick. we used to be colleagues in london for a long time. i know you've done a lot of reporting in moscow. isn't it the case that the russians will string the cypriots along here? they will get much more if they need to when the banking system collapses if that's where we're headed. surely. >> yeah, simon, you make a very good point. there's a lot of people thinking, what's the gain? they've already let the money back in 2011, they led with 2.5 billion euros. so extending that and the term on that, reduci
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)